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show your track(s)!
#1
Hello everyone,

I thought it could be nice to have a thread to show-off your track solution. Maybe it helps to get some inspiration and ideas while looking at how others solved the "motion-problem".

Here is mine. It's actually my 2nd track. The first one was based on the very popular Igus slider. Unfortunately I found this solution much to heavy and impractical. Due to the fact that I want lightweight gear which adds as little as possible to the already heavy camera gear, I decided to build a new system based on the Rhino Slider Carbon. This slider is much lighter and modular so that it can be broke down to a small-footprint-pack for transportation.

I was able to build the track without changing the original slider at all (no drills or cuts were needed). The first thing I did was designing a stepper motor holder specifically for the end-peace of the slider. The final motor holder is milled from aluminium and can be seen here as CAD-screenshot

   

...and as the actual part attached to the slider and fully assembled:

   

The (L-shaped) aluminium profiles on the inner side will later hold the limit switches.

On the other side I added a shaft block which is an off-the-shelf part I found that is perfectly fitting and came for just 8,50€. This shaft block is holding 3 ball bearings and the return shaft for the belt.

   

The solution that fixes the dolly to the belt is not really done yet but what I have right now is already working perfectly (It's just not as good looking as I want it). It is done with 2 belt-fixing-plates which are then itself fixed to the dolly with help of the 2 screws you can see in the picture.

   

Here is the whole system at work.

   


Cheers
Airic
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#2
Nice rig you have there Airic.
Indeed, being light is an advantage, especially if your track is low mounted.
If the track is not on tripods, it really does not make any sense to make it "russian style", heavy-duty rhyno gear.

It just happens that two days ago I've just finished my first 100% functional rig. After to many ideeas, I solidified to a certain setup and...here it is.

TimeLapse02

   

Reusable profiles from some old digital exchanges installations. Actually, I was extremely attracted by the already existing fixing parts and I'd liked the idea of having it scalable.

   

It took me some time to figure out a functional alignment from Stepper to Threaded rod. (yes, I know the existing standardized professional solutions). But, the KISS solution came in the shape of a gasoline hose. It's friction on the threaded rod is far greater than the stepper's torque so...it's good enough.


   

The dolly...hm....this is the weak link.
The track is only 2,5cm wide so it was quite problematic to make the dolly "stiff" on the transverse direction. And here, I'm affraid there's not much that I can do. These aluminium profiles were designed for something else.

Most probably my next track will have sliding bearings...

Till then, this one will suffice.
I figured out that if I don't do macro time-lapse, the fact that the photos will have 0,5-1 degrees misalignment between them will be impossible to notice while watching the movie. But, this is yet to be proven :-)

So, by all means: show me more non-standard ideas for these tracks....


some more details/ photos on the link below:

http://alexella.ro/foto-2/genuri-fotografice/timelapse/timelapse02/


Attached Files Thumbnail(s)
   
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#3
Hi Airic,
time passes quickly ... it's been over a year since I started my first 'serious' diy project. It was a real pleasure to fulfill my dolly, expecially thanks to your great miniE that convinced me to start building the thing. HERE is my google site page. It's in italian but there an image gallery showing my rig. My rig is a little bit rude and crafts but I wanted to keep it as cheap as possible ...
Thanks again for your great work.
Gigi
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#4
Hello Gigi,

Nice rig you've got there.
It looks good.
I've checkd the photos on picassa and also your web site but...I wonder: is that a slide dolly?
I don't see any wheels or bearings or anything similar.

In my understanding, you've used 2 Aluminium extruded rods, probably H section, some sliding material between the dolly and the track and two locking guides on each side of the track.
I'm at my second rail prototype but I'm still not satisfied with the "slack" movements.
I could not find wheels that fit EXACTLY into the Aluminium profile hence there is a 0.5mm wiggle or something. But, taking into consideration that my track is only 40mm wide, at the camera elevation point the base 0.5mm wiggle is amplified to about 2mm movement. And since I've used a threaded rod and not a CNC trapezoidal rod, that's also adds some unwanted movements...


Prototype 1, unfinished:
http://alexella.ro/foto-2/diy-photo/my-timelapse-dolly/

Prototype 2, fully functional:
http://alexella.ro/foto-2/genuri-fotografice/timelapse/timelapse02/
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#5
Hi Alexella,
yes, it's a sliding dolly on a pair of old curtain's aluminium guides, with thin wooden plates used to minimize the friction. It works just fine with almost no gap. I have also tried to use 8 little wheels mounted on the dolly as you probably did but I had the same problems. Me too I've used a simple stainless threaded rod (metric M8) and it works fine.
Ciao!

(05-10-2013, 11:50 AM)alexella Wrote: ...
I've checkd the photos on picassa and also your web site but...I wonder: is that a slide dolly?
I don't see any wheels or bearings or anything similar.
In my understanding, you've used 2 Aluminium extruded rods, probably H section, some sliding material between the dolly and the track and two locking guides on each side of the track.
I'm at my second rail prototype but I'm still not satisfied with the "slack" movements.
I could not find wheels that fit EXACTLY into the Aluminium profile hence there is a 0.5mm wiggle or something. But, taking into consideration that my track is only 40mm wide, at the camera elevation point the base 0.5mm wiggle is amplified to about 2mm movement. And since I've used a threaded rod and not a CNC trapezoidal rod, that's also adds some unwanted movements...
...
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#6
Would it be possible to download the CAD file for the Rhino slider so that I can get one built?

I have the 3 foot rhino, have built the shield and would really appreciate the parts list for how you assembled your equipment.

Thanks,

b.
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#7
(06-17-2013, 04:51 AM)brads Wrote: I have the 3 foot rhino, have built the shield and would really appreciate the parts list for how you assembled your equipment.

I'll send you the files per post mail later today.

A.
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#8
(06-18-2013, 03:44 PM)Airic Lenz Wrote:
(06-17-2013, 04:51 AM)brads Wrote: I have the 3 foot rhino, have built the shield and would really appreciate the parts list for how you assembled your equipment.

I'll send you the files per post mail later today.

A.

Thank you.
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#9
Hi there,

I'm not sure if there is the best place to post this [possibly need a "show us your kit" posting section], but here we go....

I'm in the process of writing a blog with details of all of the parts i used/made/adapted, loads of pics of the project from start to finish, but for now, here's is a very short clip from one of my local parks...





I set the camera on 100% manual settings (focus, ISO, shutter etc...), the total number of photo's totals 300 from one end of the slider rail to the other and the compiled video runs at 30fps in 1080p. I should really change that to 24/25 fps to keep with PAL footage.

Comments welcome...


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#10
Hi there,

nice to see some footage here! There is actually a thread for presenting this kind of stuff and I am going to move this post to the right place Wink

Your footage looks great for a test shot. I am wondering if you shot in RAW or if you used JPG? I usually use S-RAW a lower resolution RAW for saving some space on the memory cards) and then develop every frame.

I am looking forward to your blog!

Cheers,
Airic
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